INDICATION: LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) tablets are a prescription medicine used to treat people with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and who have previously been treated with or cannot receive certain chemotherapy medicines. It is not known if LONSURF is safe and effective in children.
INDICATION: LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) tablets are a prescription medicine used to treat people with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and who have previously been treated with or cannot receive certain chemotherapy medicines. It is not known if LONSURF is safe and effective in children.
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Already Taking LONSURF

What is LONSURF?

LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) tablets, a prescription medicine, is for people:

  • Whose colon or rectal cancer has spread to other parts of the body (this is called “metastatic”)
  • Who have previously been treated with or cannot receive certain chemotherapy medicines
  • Who now may need another option

LONSURF was studied in a clinical trial of 800 patients.

  • Half of the patients treated with LONSURF were still alive at 7.1 months and half of the patients who received placebo were still alive at 5.3 months
  • Worsening of the disease or death occurred in 88% of patients treated with LONSURF and 94% of patients who received placebo

Living with colon or rectal cancer can be difficult, but you are not alone. You are facing it with your family, friends, and loved ones. LONSURF may give you the chance to continue the journey longer alongside them.

Who should take LONSURF?

LONSURF is used to treat those with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and who have been previously treated with or cannot take certain chemotherapy medicines.

Those previous medicines may include:

  • Fluoropyrimidine
    Such as 5‑fluorouracil, also known as 5‑FU

  • Oxaliplatin‑based treatment
    Such as FOLFOX (5‑FU, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin); CAPOX (capecitabine and oxaliplatin); or Eloxatin® (oxaliplatin)

  • Irinotecan‑based treatment
    Such as FOLFIRI (5‑FU, leucovorin, and irinotecan); CAPIRI (capecitabine and irinotecan); or Camptosar® (irinotecan)

  • Anti‑VEGF biological therapy, or VEGF inhibitors
    Such as Avastin® (bevacizumab); or Zaltrap® (ziv‑aflibercept)

  • Anti‑EGFR therapy, or EGFR inhibitors (if you have the KRAS wild type gene)
    Such as Erbitux® (cetuximab); or Vectibix® (panitumumab)

If you aren't sure what treatments you've had in the past, ask your healthcare provider.

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How can LONSURF help me?

With proven results to help patients live longer, LONSURF is a treatment that may allow you to continue your journey with refractory mCRC.

LONSURF has been proven to

  • Allow patients to live longer
  • Slow or stop the growth of cancer for a period of time

LONSURF was studied in a clinical trial of 800 patients with colon or rectal cancer that had spread to other parts of the body and had previously been treated with certain chemotherapy medicines.

  • Half of the patients treated with LONSURF were still alive at 7.1 months and half of the patients who received placebo were still alive at 5.3 months
  • Worsening of the disease or death occurred in 88% of patients treated with LONSURF and 94% of patients who received placebo
Questions to ask your doctor

How it works

LONSURF is the first FDA‑approved combination tablet for refractory metastatic colon or rectal cancer. It is an oral chemotherapy that is 2 medicines in 1.

  • One part helps the other part stay active and work properly
  • The other part stops cells from making copies of themselves. This may help stop tumors from growing
FDA = Food and Drug Administration

Important information and side effects

Your healthcare provider should check your blood cell counts before you receive LONSURF, at day 15 during treatment, and as needed.

  • Low blood counts are common with LONSURF and can sometimes be severe and life‑threatening. LONSURF can cause a decrease in your white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Low white blood cells can make you more likely to get serious infections that could lead to death. Your healthcare provider may lower your dose or stop LONSURF if you have low white blood cell or low platelet counts

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any signs of infection such as fever, chills, or body aches.

Almost all patients treated with LONSURF experience side effects at some time.

Some common side effects you may experience include:

  • Tiredness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fever

Tell your healthcare provider if you have nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea that is severe or that does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects of LONSURF.

Find some practical tips on managing some of the side effects of LONSURF with our simple tool.

Get tips

If you have been prescribed LONSURF, follow this simple checklist:

Take your temperature each day
Record your temperature and any side effects you have on your Treatment Calendar
Bring the calendar with you to doctors' appointments as a reminder of what to discuss with your healthcare providers

How to take LONSURF

LONSURF is an oral chemotherapy tablet you swallow:

  • Twice a day
  • After you eat breakfast and dinner (immediately after or up to 1 hour after)
    • LONSURF may cause a decrease in white blood cells. Taking LONSURF after morning and evening meals may help lessen this effect. This is important because a low white blood cell count can make you more prone to infection
    • The type of food does not matter

LONSURF comes in 2 strengths: 15‑mg and 20‑mg tablets.* Your healthcare provider may prescribe both strengths for your prescribed dose.

*Tablet strength of LONSURF is based on 1 active part of the medicine.
LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) 15 mg and 20 mg tablets Tablets shown are not actual size.
Watch Mollie Reed, Oncology Nurse, outline six important tips for taking your medicine as prescribed to help you stick to your treatment plan.

LONSURF 28‑day treatment schedule

LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) tablets Treatment Schedule

You will take LONSURF after morning and evening meals for 5 days a week, and then rest for 2 days. This goes on for 2 weeks.

Then you will not take LONSURF for 2 weeks (14 days).

This is repeated for as long as your healthcare provider says. Always follow all of your healthcare provider's directions carefully.

Create and print a personalized Treatment Calendar.

Other things to keep in mind about taking LONSURF

  • Store LONSURF at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C to 25°C).
  • Don't store LONSURF with other medicines. Keep LONSURF in its own container.
  • If you store your tablets outside of the original container, any unused LONSURF tablets should be disposed of after 30 days.
  • Wash your hands after handling LONSURF. Even though it is a pill, it is still chemotherapy.
  • Make sure your caregiver wears gloves when handling LONSURF.
  • Note that there is a packet inside the bottle that helps absorb moisture. Do not swallow this material.
  • Keep LONSURF out of the reach of children.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You miss a dose. Do not take additional doses to make up for the missed dose. Call your healthcare provider for instructions about what to do for a missed dose
  • You have leftover tablets. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist will tell you how to dispose of them properly

Interested in receiving a LONSURF Starter Kit? The Kit contains useful tools to help you learn more about LONSURF and stay on track.

Important Safety Information +

LONSURF may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Low blood counts. Low blood counts are common with LONSURF and can sometimes be severe and life‑threatening. LONSURF can cause a decrease in your white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Low white blood cells can make you more likely to get serious infections that could lead to death. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests before you receive LONSURF, at day 15 during treatment with LONSURF, and as needed to check your blood cell counts. Your healthcare provider may lower your dose of LONSURF or stop LONSURF if you have low white blood cell or platelet counts

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following signs and symptoms of infection during treatment with LONSURF: fever, chills, or body aches.

Before taking LONSURF, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have kidney or liver problems
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. LONSURF can harm your unborn baby
    • Females who can become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment with LONSURF. Tell your healthcare provider immediately if you become pregnant
    • Males, while on treatment and for 3 months after your last dose of LONSURF, you should use a condom during sex with female partners who are able to become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider right away if your partner becomes pregnant while you are taking LONSURF
  • Are breast‑feeding or plan to breast‑feed. It is not known if LONSURF passes into your breast milk. Do not breast‑feed during treatment with LONSURF and for 1 day after your last dose of LONSURF

Tell your healthcare provider about all the prescription and over‑the‑counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements you take.

The most common side effects with LONSURF include tiredness, nausea, decreased appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and fever.

Tell your doctor if you have nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea that is severe or that does not go away.

These are not all of the possible side effects of LONSURF. For more information, ask your healthcare provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.