INDICATION: LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) tablets are a prescription medicine used to treat people with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and who have previously been treated with or cannot receive certain chemotherapy medicines. It is not known if LONSURF is safe and effective in children.
INDICATION: LONSURF® (trifluridine and tipiracil) tablets are a prescription medicine used to treat people with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and who have previously been treated with or cannot receive certain chemotherapy medicines. It is not known if LONSURF is safe and effective in children.
Caregivers' Center
Taking Care of Your Loved One
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Being a caregiver is not easy. Cancer makes a big impact not only on the patient, but on those around him or her. It can take an emotional and physical toll.

As you care for your loved one, remember:

  • You play a key part in your loved one's treatment journey, but you are not alone. There are family members, doctors, nurses, an extended care team, and other resources to help you and your loved one through this
  • Your well‑being has a direct effect on how well you care for your loved one. Sometimes, it is easy to forget about yourself, but it is important to maintain balance in your life. Find a little part of your day to relax and take care of yourself. Take some time to participate in the things you enjoy

Plan time for:

Mental health:

  • Have coffee with a friend or dinner with your wife, husband, or partner
  • Watch a movie
  • Read a book
  • Listen to music

Physical health:

Get regular exercise, e.g.

  • Go for a walk
  • Stretch
  • Do yoga
  • Continue with any sports or clubs you are part of

Remember that a few minutes every day can still make a difference.

Emotional/spiritual:

  • Consider meditation
  • Stay in touch with your religious community
  • Try to appreciate the good things and people in your life

Getting the support you need

You don't have to take on the entire task of providing care. Don't be afraid to ask for help. You can:

  • Create a support network. This could be close family or friends
  • Plan a schedule for the week. Share it with family and friends so they can help
  • Ask the doctor, nurses, or office staff. They may help you find a counselor, support group, or other means of support

Another way you can help your loved one is to stay informed about colon or rectal cancer and the treatments for it. The following organizations can provide you with updated information about colon or rectal cancer as well as resources, advocacy, community, and support.

CancerCare®:
Go to cancercare.org or call 1‑800‑813‑HOPE (4673)1‑800‑813‑HOPE (4673)
Cancer Support Community (CSC):
Go to cancersupportcommunity.org or call 1‑888‑793‑93551‑888‑793‑9355
Fight Colorectal Cancer:
Go to fightCRC.org or call 1‑877‑427‑21111‑877‑427‑2111
Colon Cancer Alliance:
Go to ccalliance.org or call 1‑877‑422‑20301‑877‑422‑2030
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Important Safety Information +

LONSURF may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Low blood counts. Low blood counts are common with LONSURF and can sometimes be severe and life‑threatening. LONSURF can cause a decrease in your white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Low white blood cells can make you more likely to get serious infections that could lead to death. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests before you receive LONSURF, at day 15 during treatment with LONSURF, and as needed to check your blood cell counts. Your healthcare provider may lower your dose of LONSURF or stop LONSURF if you have low white blood cell or platelet counts

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following signs and symptoms of infection during treatment with LONSURF: fever, chills, or body aches.

Before taking LONSURF, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have kidney or liver problems
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. LONSURF can harm your unborn baby
    • Females who can become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment with LONSURF. Tell your healthcare provider immediately if you become pregnant
    • Males, while on treatment and for 3 months after your last dose of LONSURF, you should use a condom during sex with female partners who are able to become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider right away if your partner becomes pregnant while you are taking LONSURF
  • Are breast‑feeding or plan to breast‑feed. It is not known if LONSURF passes into your breast milk. Do not breast‑feed during treatment with LONSURF and for 1 day after your last dose of LONSURF

Tell your healthcare provider about all the prescription and over‑the‑counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements you take.

The most common side effects with LONSURF include tiredness, nausea, decreased appetite, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and fever.

Tell your doctor if you have nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea that is severe or that does not go away.

These are not all of the possible side effects of LONSURF. For more information, ask your healthcare provider. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.